Category: The Complete Herbal by Nicholas Culpeper

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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Medicines resisting poison

CHAPTER XIII. Of Medicines resisting poison. Such medicines are called Alexiteria, and Alexipharmaca, which resist poison. Some of these resist poison by astral influence, and some physicians (though but few) can give a reason for it. These they have sorted into three ranks: 1. Such as strengthen nature, that so it may tame the poison the easier.…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of purging Medicines

CHAPTER XIV. Of purging Medicines. Much jarring hath been amongst physicians about purging medicines, namely, whether they draw the humours to them by a hidden quality, which in plain English is, they know not how; or whether they perform their office by manifest quality, viz. by heat, dryness, coldness, or moisture: it is not my…
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Nicholas Culpeper -Of glutinative Medicines

CHAPTER XII. Of glutinative Medicines. That is the true cure of an ulcer which joins the mouth of it together. That is a glutinative medicine, which couples together by drying and binding, the sides of an ulcer before brought together. These require a greater drying faculty than the former, not only to consume what flows…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Medicines breeding flesh

CHAPTER XI. Of Medicines breeding flesh. There are many things diligently to be observed in the cures of wounds and ulcers, which incur and hinder that the cure cannot be speedily done, nor the separated parts reduced to their natural state. Viz. Fluxes of blood, inflammation, hardness, pain, and other things besides our present scope. Our…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Medicines provoking urine

CHAPTER X. Of Medicines provoking urine. The causes by which urine is suppressed are many. 1. By too much drying, or sweating, it may be consumed. 2. By heat or inflammation of the reins, or passages whereby it passes from the reins, it may be stopped by compression. Urine is the thinnest part of blood,…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of suppuring Medicines

CHAPTER IX. Of suppuring Medicines. These have a great affinity with emolients, like to them in temperature, only emolients are somewhat hotter. Yet is there a difference as apparent as the sun when he is upon the meridian, and the use is manifest. For, Emolients are to make hard things soft, but what suppures, rather…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Emplasters

CHAPTER VIII. Of Emplasters. By Emplasters, here, I do mean things glutinative, and they are quite contrary to things cleansing. They are of a far more glutinous and tenacious substance. They differ from things stopping because they do not stop the pores so much, as stick to them like Birdlime. They have a certain glutinous…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of cleansing Medicines

CHAPTER VII. Of cleansing Medicines. Cleansing medicines can neither be defined by heat, nor coldness, because some of both sorts cleanse. A cleansing medicine, then, is of a terrene quality, which takes away the filth with it, and carries it out. Definition.] Here, to avoid confusion, a difference must be made between washing and cleansing.…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of repelling Medicines

CHAPTER VI. Of repelling Medicines Repelling medicines are of contrary operation to these three last mentioned, viz. attenuating, drawing, and discussive medicines: It is true, there is but little difference between these three, some hold none at all; and if you will be so nice, you may oppose them thus. And so medicines making thick,…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of discussive Medicines

CHAPTER V. Of discussive Medicines. The nature of discussing (or sweating) medicines is almost the same with attractive, for there are no discussive medicines but are attractive, nor scarce any attractive medicine but is in some measure or other discussing. The difference then is only this; that discussive medicines are hotter than attractive, and therefore nothing…
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Nicholas Culpeper Of Loosening Medicines

CHAPTER III. Of Loosening Medicines. By loosening here, I do not mean purging, nor that which is opposite to astringency; but that which is opposite to stretching: I knew not suddenly what fitter English name to give it, than loosening or laxation, which latter is scarce English. The members are distended or stretched divers ways,…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of hardening Medicines

CHAPTER II. Of hardening Medicines. Galen in Lib. 5. de Simple, Med. Facult. Cap. 10. determines hardening medicines to be cold and moist, and he brings some arguments to prove it, against which other physicians contest. I shall not here stand to quote the dispute, only take notice, that if softening medicines be hot and moist (as…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Medicines appropriated to the womb

CHAPTER VIII. Of Medicines appropriated to the womb. These, physicians call Hystericals, and to avoid multiplicity of words, take them in this discourse under that notion. Take notice that such medicines as provoke the menses, or stop them when they flow immoderately, are properly hystericals, but shall be spoken to by and by in a chapter…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Medicines appropriated to the spleen

CHAPTER VI. Of Medicines appropriated to the spleen. In the breeding of blood, are three excrements most conspicuous, viz. urine, choler, and melancholy. The proper seat of choler is in the gall. The urine passeth down to the reins or kidneys, which is all one. The spleen takes the thickest or melancholy blood to itself. This excrement of…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of drawing Medicines

CHAPTER IV. Of drawing Medicines. The opinion of physicians is, concerning these, as it is concerning other medicines, viz. Some draw by a manifest quality, some by a hidden, and so (quoth they) they draw to themselves both humours and thorns, or splinters that are gotten into the flesh; however this is certain, they are…
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Nicholas Culpeper – Of Medicines appropriated to the stomach

CHAPTER IV. Of Medicines appropriated to the stomach. By stomach, I mean that ventricle which contains the food till it be concocted into chyle. Medicines appropriated to the stomach are usually called stomachicals. The infirmities usually incident to the stomach are three. 1. Appetite lost. 2. Digestion weakened. 3. The retentive faculty corrupted. When the…
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